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Please call or email Amanda at 015757766218 / amabodell@gmail.com to reserve your time slot on either date:

12.12 from 10 am to 8 pm
26.1.19 from 12 - 6 pm

NO PREP NEEDED BUT WELCOMED!

GOOD MORNING! THE MORNING SHOW by Candelaria Saenz Valiente is a parody-T.V. serial set in the office and studio of a fictional daytime show called “Good morning!”. The behind the scenes and off the set scenes will gradually take over. Most of the prominent members of Berlin's indie music scene will take part of the show. We are looking for actors, comedians and odd looking people of all ages to take part in the series. Shooting of the pilot starts next June. We'll try and pitch it to Comedy central, AdultSwim and more. Join us!

GMTMS follows the format of “daytime talks and crafts show” that was geared towards middle aged women and was popular in the 80s and 90s. The main inspiration for the format of the show is the Argentinian TV hit “Utilisima”. “Utilisima”, which means, “very useful”, was a portrait of female blandness and uselessness. This unintentional irony and the humor found in the vast moments of failed, cringe-worthy improvisation resonated among a more critical portion of its audience.

GMTMS doesn’t want to replicate, but to reimagine Utilisima: What if the show had obliterated the concept of housewife?

Hauntology: "something that gives us nostalgia for a past that never truly existed”. Aesthetically this fits perfectly with the music/arts genre vaporwave. Borrowing certain set design elements from vaporwave would reinforce the desired effect of GMTMS, a show which is vaguely recognizable but also vaguely obscure.

INSPIRATIONS

Its main inspiration is the Argentinian hit TV show “Utilisima”. “Utilisima”, which means, “very useful”, was hosted by women who introduced handcrafts, health, beauty tips… to millions of housewives across Latin America. The portrait of blandness and uselessness that women posed for back then both funnily and tragically conflicted with the show’s name. The irony and the humor found in the vast moments of failed improvisation resonated amongst a smaller and more critical portion of its audience.

Another major inspiration is Gary Shandling’s “The Larry Sanders Show”. The genius behind his show was its meta reality, the idea of a show within a show and the fact that at first glance it was hard to tell it was fiction. GMTMS will try and honor its legacy.

Other notable inspirations:

Humor and timing: Werner Herzog who in his documentaries has purposefully recreated cringe worthy moments to paramount success. The argentinian comedy shows “Cha cha cha” with Alfredo Casero and Juana Molina’s “Juana y sus hermanas”; the British series “The league of gentlemen” and “Ab Fab”; the 90’s Canadian comedy group show “The kids in the hall”; Larry David’s “Seinfeld” and “Curb your enthusiasm”; SNL; John C. Reilly’s “Stevie! - Starring Dr. Steve Brule”; Eric Andre; and possibly more.

Editing: Most definitely inspiring is the use of quick editing, mastered by comedians Tim Heiddeker and Eric Wareheim in their show “Tim & Eric: Great show, well done”.

Mood: British talk shows from the 70’s.

Aesthetics: There is a proper term for reimagining the past: Hauntology, "something that gives us nostalgia for a past that never truly existed”. Aesthetically this fits perfectly with what defines vaporwave, which is a musical micro genre which sprung from the confines of the internet in 2010. Borrowing certain design elements from vaporwave would reinforce the desired effect of GMTMS, a show which is vaguely recognizable but also vaguely obscure.
Other notable inspirations are modern Opera sets (Krystian Lupa for Teatr Wielki), video games and tv shows shot in the 60s and 70s which included televised live bands. The video game “Monument Valley” and the installations of James Turrell are also worthy inspirations. Turrell's experience of “Ganzfeld”, a phenomenon of total loss of depth perception, is an interesting experiment to try. Some advantages of a large, seemingly endless space are vanishing points and characters appearing in distant planes.
Cinematically, it may look like the works of Stanley Kubrick and Todd Solondz.